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Prochlorperazine Inj.

Prochlorperazine Inj.

Prochlorperazine Injection Description

Prochlorperazine Edisylate Injection, an antiemetic and antipsychotic, is a sterile solution intended for intramuscular or intravenous administration.

Prochlorperazine Injection - Clinical Pharmacology

Prochlorperazine is a propylpiperazine derivative of phenothiazine. Like other phenothiazines, it exerts an antiemetic effect through a depressant action on the chemoreceptor trigger zone. It also has a clinically useful antipsychotic effect. Following intramuscular administration of prochlorperazine edisylate, the drug has an onset of action within ten to twenty minutes and a duration of action of three to four hours.

Indications and Usage for Prochlorperazine Injection

To control severe nausea and vomiting. For the treatment of schizophrenia.Prochlorperazine has not been shown effective in the management of behavioral complications in patients with mental retardation.

Contraindications

Do not use in patients with known hypersensitivity to phenothiazines.Do not use in comatose states or in the presence of large amounts of central nervous system depressants (alcohol, barbiturates, narcotics, etc.).Do not use in pediatric surgery.Do not use in pediatric patients under 2 years of age or under 20 lbs. Do not use in children for conditions for which dosage has not been established.

Warnings

Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related PsychosisElderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Prochlorperazine Edisylate Injection, USP is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis (see BOXED WARNING).The extrapyramidal symptoms which can occur secondary to prochlorperazine may be confused with the central nervous system signs of an undiagnosed primary disease responsible for the vomiting, e.g., Reye’s syndrome or other encephalopathy. The use of prochlorperazine and other potential hepatotoxins should be avoided in children and adolescents whose signs and symptoms suggest Reye’s syndrome.

 

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