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Pomalidomide

Pomalidomide

What Is Pomalidomide?

Pomalidomide affects the immune system. It promotes immune responses to help slow tumor growth.

Pomalidomide is used to treat multiple myeloma (cancer resulting from a progressive blood disease). Pomalidomide is usually given after at least two other medications have been tried without success.

Pomalidomide is available only from a certified pharmacy under a special program called Pomalyst REMS. Your doctor must be registered in the program in order to prescribe pomalidomide for you. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the dangers of this medication and that you agree to use birth control measures as required by the program.

Pomalidomide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Pomalidomide Interactions

Do not donate blood or sperm while you are using pomalidomide.

Pomalidomide may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

This medicine can pass into body fluids (urine, feces, vomit). Caregivers should wear rubber gloves while cleaning up a patient's body fluids, handling contaminated trash or laundry or changing diapers. Wash hands before and after removing gloves. Wash soiled clothing and linens separately from other laundry.

Taking pomalidomide with other drugs that cause dizziness or confusion can worsen these effects. Ask your doctor before taking pomalidomide with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Other drugs may interact with pomalidomide, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Pomalidomide Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blistering and peeling of your skin;
  • numbness, tingling, or burning pain in your hands or feet;
  • heart attack symptoms--chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;
  • liver problems--nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • low blood cell counts--fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, swollen gums, mouth sores, skin sores, rapid heart rate, pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, feeling light-headed;
  • signs of a stroke--sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;
  • signs of a blood clot in the lung--chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, coughing up blood;
  • signs of a blood clot in your leg--pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in one or both legs; or
  • signs of tumor cell breakdown--lower back pain, blood in your urine, little or no urinating; numbness or tingly feeling around your mouth; muscle weakness or tightness; fast or slow heart rate, weak pulse, feeling short of breath; confusion, fainting.
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