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Normal Hcg Levels At 5 Weeks

normal hcg levels at 5 weeks

normal hcg levels

When you're pregnant, it's natural to want to swap notes about every twitch and test result with other moms. But when it comes to hCG, the hormone detected in home pregnancy tests as well as the blood test variety, trading tales may just make you spin your wheels with worry. That's because every woman's hormone levels can fluctuate enormously from day to day, person to person, and even pregnancy to pregnancy.

A brand new placenta starts pumping out hCG, or human chorionic gonadotropin, a few days after the budding embryo implants in the uterine wall. Although low hCG levels are completely normal in early pregnancy (hCG is just starting to show up in your system, after all), it'll soon begin to soar, doubling every 48 hours, give or take. The rapid increase peaks somewhere between seven and 12 weeks after the last menstrual period (LMP), and then starts to decline. And somewhere in there, if you are expecting, your hCG levels will yield a positive pregnancy test!

While it might sound like a predictable increase, levels aren't even close to predictable. Experts have found a huge variation in hCG levels on even the first missed day of a woman's period. Some women have almost no measurable hCG, while others have readings of over 400.

When hCG Results Can Signal a Problem

In instances where a first hCG measurement is lower than expected, or when there is cause to worry about miscarriage due to previous loss or other symptoms, a second test will most likely be ordered. When there is a decline in the level of hCG from the first test to the second test, this often means a miscarriage may take place, also known as impending miscarriage.

If you are concerned about your hCG levels, you should direct your questions to your physician and try not to read too much into any single measurement.

hCG blood levels

Low levels of hCG may be detected in your blood within about 7 days of you becoming pregnant. hCG levels are highest towards the end of the first trimester, then gradually decline over the rest of your pregnancy.

The average levels of hCG in a pregnant woman’s blood are:

  • non-pregnant women - less than 10 U/L
  • borderline pregnancy result - 10 to 25 U/L
  • positive pregnancy test - more than 25 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 4 weeks after the LMP (average 1 week before first missed period) - 0 to 750 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 5 weeks after the LMP (week after first missed period) - 200 to 7,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 6 weeks after the LMP - 200 to 32,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 7th weeks after the LMP - 3,000 to 160,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 8 to 12 weeks after the LMP - 32,000 to 210,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 13 to 16 weeks after the LMP - 9,000 to 210,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 16 to 29 weeks after the LMP - 1,400 to 53,000 U/L
  • pregnant women, about 29 to 41 weeks after the LMP - 940 to 60,000 U/L

 Comparing Slow Rising And Normal Rising hCG Levels

Comparing changes in hCG titers with those of established expected curves can help the doctor determine what to do about the pregnancy and how to counsel the patient. However, there are many limitations to the serial assessment of hCG titers and the titers should never be used exclusively to replace clinical judgment based on symptoms or signs.

A normally rising hCG level would usually be a level that rises over 60% over a 48 period, though later on in pregnancy, the rise would be normally slower. Seebert et al reported in 2006 and Morse confirmed this in 2012 that a rise of at least 35% over 48 hours was proposed as the minimal rise consistent with a viable intrauterine pregnancy.

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