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Lidocaine

Lidocaine

Descriptions

Lidocaine topical jelly or ointment is used on different parts of the body to cause numbness or loss of feeling for patients having certain medical procedures. It is also used to relieve pain and itching caused by conditions such as sunburn or other minor burns, insect bites or stings, poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, minor cuts, or scratches.

Lidocaine viscous topical solution is also used to treat sore mouth or throat and also reduce gagging during the taking of X-ray pictures and dental impressions.

Lidocaine skin patch is used to relieve pain caused by shingles (postherpetic neuralgia).

What Is Lidocaine And How Does It Work?

Lidocaine is used to relieve nerve pain after shingles (infection with the herpes zoster virus). This type of pain is called post-herpetic neuralgia. Lidocaine helps to reduce sharp/burning/aching pain as well as discomfort caused by skin areas that are overly sensitive to touch. Lidocaine belongs to a class of drugs known as local anesthetics. It works by causing a temporary loss of feeling in the area where you apply the patch.

How to use Lidocaine Cream Topical Local Anesthetics

Before use on the skin, clean and dry the affected area as directed. Apply a thin layer of medication to the affected area of skin, usually 2 to 3 times a day or as directed.

If you are using the spray, shake the canister well before using. While holding the canister 3-5 inches (8-13 centimeters) from the affected area, spray until wet. If the affected area is on the face, spray the medication onto your hand and apply to the face. Do not spray near your eyes, nose, or mouth.

Lidocaine Side Effects

  • High blood pressure
  • Swelling or swelling or redness of the skin at the site of injection if receiving lidocaine via injection into the veins
  • Constipation, nausea, and/or vomiting
  • Confusion, dizziness, headache, funny feeling or tingling in the toes, fingers, or hands

Lidocaine Warnings

You should not take lidocaine if you have any of the following:

Heart conditions like Adams-Stokes syndrome or heart blocks without a pacemaker

Congestive heart failure (CHF) or heart shock

Talk to your doctor before taking lidocaine if you are taking drugs called beta-blockers, including Inderal (propranolol), Bystolic (nebivolol), Lopressor (metoprolol tartrate), and Toprol XL (metoprolol succinate).

To date, whether lidocaine can help prevent a heart attack remains much-debated. If you have any concerns about this issue, talk to your doctor.

Pregnancy and Lidocaine

Lidocaine is an FDA Pregnancy Category B drug, which means it is generally safe to use during pregnancy because there is low risk of harm for your developing baby.

Regardless, you should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before taking this medication.

You should also alert your physician if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed before using lidocaine.

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