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Hcg Levels In Pregnancy

Hcg Levels In Pregnancy

hCG levels

 Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone normally produced by the placenta. If you are pregnant, you can detect it in your urine. Blood tests measuring hCG levels can also be used to check how well your pregnancy is progressing, including your baby’s development.

Confirming pregnancy

After you conceive (when the sperm fertilises the egg), the developing placenta begins to produce and release hCG.

It takes about 2 weeks for your hCG levels to be high enough to be detected in your urine using a home pregnancy test.

A positive home test result is almost certainly correct, but a negative result is less reliable.

If you do a pregnancy test on the first day of your missed period, and it’s negative, wait about a week. If you still think you might be pregnant, do the test again or see your doctor.

What do high hCG levels mean?

High hCG levels can mean a few possible outcomes, and it’s important to consult with your doctor to know for sure:

Miscalculation of pregnancy dating: As in the case of low hCG levels, miscalculating the pregnancy date can mean inaccurate expectations of hCG counts.

Molar pregnancy: While not technically a form of miscarriage, a molar pregnancy is when defective placenta cells, which either grow too fast or around a non-viable embryo, continue secreting hCG. If you experience heavy bleeding in early pregnancy and have high hCG levels or experience high blood pressure in early pregnancy, then it’s possible that a molar pregnancy has occurred. It’s important to seek a medical professional right away in order to assess whether intervention to remove the abnormal cell growth is needed.

Multiple pregnancy: If hCG levels are higher than expected, it’s possible that you could be pregnant with multiple embryos, meaning twins or more.

Increase Of hCG In Early Pregnancy

hCG usually doubles every 48-72 hours very early in pregnancy and every 3-4 days later on until about 9-10 weeks of the pregnancy when it levels off. There is no single "normal" hCG level during early pregnancy and there are wide ranges of normal levels which you can check with our hCG calculator.

Where does hCG come from?

hCG comes from the placenta and enters the blood soon after implantation and is detected via pregnancy tests. hCG starts to be produced by the placenta as soon as implantation occurs. This happens about one week after fertilization and ovulation when the embryo implants and the placenta attaches to the uterine lining.

Timing of test          

False negative readings can occur when testing is done too early. Quantitative blood tests and the most sensitive urine tests usually begin to detect hCG shortly after implantation, which can occur anywhere from 6 to 12 days after ovulation. hCG levels continue to rise through the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, so the chances of false negative test results diminish with time (gestation age).[1] Less sensitive urine tests and qualitative blood[10] tests may not detect pregnancy until three or four days after implantation. Menstruation occurs on average 14 days after ovulation, so the likelihood of a false negative is low once a menstrual period is late.

Ovulation may not occur at a predictable time in the menstrual cycle, however. A number of factors may cause an unexpectedly early or late ovulation, even for women with a history of regular menstrual cycles. Using ovulation predictor kits (OPKs), or charting the fertility signs of cervical mucus or basal body temperature give a more accurate idea of when to test than day-counting alone

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