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Hcg Levels At 6 Weeks

Hcg Levels At 6 Weeks

What Is hCG Human Chorionic Gonadotropin?

hCG stands for "Human Chorionic Gonadotropin," the pregnancy hormone, which is produced by the placenta and which is detected in the blood within a few days after implantation. When you test at home with a pregnancy test, you actually test for the presence of hCG in the urine. If hCG is present, then the pregnancy test will be positive, and that means you are pregnant unless there is a false positive pregnancy test.

Increase Of hCG In Early Pregnancy

hCG usually doubles every 48-72 hours very early in pregnancy and every 3-4 days later on until about 9-10 weeks of the pregnancy when it levels off. There is no single "normal" hCG level during early pregnancy and there are wide ranges of normal levels which you can check with our hCG calculator.

Where does hCG come from?

hCG comes from the placenta and enters the blood soon after implantation and is detected via pregnancy tests. hCG starts to be produced by the placenta as soon as implantation occurs. This happens about one week after fertilization and ovulation when the embryo implants and the placenta attaches to the uterine lining..

What is an hCG test?

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone produced by your placenta once an embryo implants in the uterus.

The purpose of the hormone is to tell your body to continue to produce progesterone, which prevents menstruation from occurring. This protects the endometrial uterine lining and your pregnancy.

A pregnancy test can detect hCG in your urine if your levels are high enough. This is how the test identifies that you are pregnant. But only a blood test can give you a precise numerical hCG reading.

Miscarriage

A miscarriage is a pregnancy loss that occurs before 20 weeks of gestation. Sometimes low hCG levels can indicate that you have had or will have a miscarriage. If the pregnancy fails to develop a placenta, then the levels may be normal initially but fail to rise. Common signs that you are experiencing a miscarriage are:

  • vaginal bleeding
  • abdominal cramps
  • passing tissue or clots
  • cessation of pregnancy symptoms
  • discharge of white/pink mucus

 Ectopic pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy is when the fertilized egg remains in the fallopian tube and continues to develop. It’s a dangerous and life-threatening condition, as it may cause the fallopian tube to rupture and bleed excessively. Low hCG levels can help to indicate an ectopic pregnancy. At first the symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy can be similar to those of a normal pregnancy, but as it progresses you can experience the following:

  • abdominal or pelvic pain that worsens with straining or movement (this can happen strongly on one side initially and then spread)
  • heavy vaginal bleeding
  • shoulder pain caused by internal bleeding (the bleeding aggravates the diaphragm and presents as pain at the tip of the shoulder)
  • pain during intercourse
  • pain during a pelvic examination

How hCG Is Measured

Following conception, hCG can be detected in the blood as early as day 11 using a test known as the quantitative serial beta-hCG assay, which measures the volume of hCG in a milliliter of blood. A single hCG test may be used to see if levels are within the normal range expected at that point in pregnancy.

In order to see how quickly hCG is doubling, serial hCG measurements are done. Quantitative hCG blood tests are drawn two to three days apart in line with expected rates of increase. By and large, serial testing provides more useful information than a single hCG level when evaluating a pregnancy.

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