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Dorzolamide + Timolol

Dorzolamide + Timolol

What Is Dorzolamide-Timolol Ophthalmic?

Dorzolamide ophthalmic reduces the amount of fluid in the eye, which decreases pressure inside the eye.

Timolol ophthalmic is a beta-blocker that also reduces pressure inside the eye.

Dorzolamide and timolol ophthalmic (for the eyes) is a combination medicine used to treat certain types of glaucoma and other causes of high pressure inside the eye.

Dorzolamide and timolol ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Why is this medication prescribed?

The combination of dorzolamide and timolol is used to treat eye conditions, including glaucoma and ocular hypertension, in which increased pressure can lead to a gradual loss of vision. Dorzolamide and timolol is used for patients whose eye condition has not responded to another medication. Dorzolamide is in a class of medications called topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Timolol is in a class of medications called topical beta blockers. Dorzolamide and timolol lowers pressure in the eye by decreasing the production of natural fluids in the eye.

How should this medicine be used?

The combination of dorzolamide and timolol comes as a solution (liquid) to instill in the eye. It is usually instilled in the affected eye(s) twice a day. To help you remember to use dorzolamide and timolol, use it at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use dorzolamide and timolol exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Dorzolamide and timolol combination controls glaucoma and ocular hypertension but does not cure them. Continue to use dorzolamide and timolol even if you feel well. Do not stop using dorzolamide and timolol without talking to your doctor.

Side Effect

Major and Minor Dorzolamide Side Effect

  • drooping eyelid
  • sensitivity of eyes to light
  • bitter or strange taste in the mouth
  • cough
  • flu symptoms
  • nausea
  • upset stomach
  • stomach pain
  • back pain
  • sore throat
  • stuffy nose
  • headache

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies

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