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Disulfiram Like

disulfiram like

Disulfiram and Disulfiram-Like

Disulfiram continues to be prescribed as part of alcohol treatment programs and is being more widely studied for other drugs of abuse. Disulfiram toxicity associated with acute overdose, chronic therapy, and from disulfiram—ethanol reactions continues to be reported worldwide. Most of the adverse effects are from case reports and case series which are difficult to interpret because of complications and comorbidities associated with alcohol use and alcoholism, the potential effects of polypharmacy.

Use of other drugs of abuse, and difficulty in relating specific adverse effects to disulfiram, alcohol or a disulfiram—ethanol reaction. Although serious and life-threatening effects associated with disulfiram are rare, clinicians and toxicologists must remain vigilant in diagnosing and appropriately managing patients with disulfiram associated toxicity.

Definition of Disulfaram-like

A process in the body that produces symptoms similar to those that occur when alcohol is consumed after taking disulfaram (Antabuse). Disulfiram is an oral drug used for treating alcoholism that causes unpleasant symptoms when alcohol is consumed. This happens because alcohol is first converted in the body into acetaldehyde by an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase. Another enzyme known as acetaldehyde dehydrogenase then converts acetaldehyde into acetic acid. Disulfiram prevents acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from converting acetaldehyde into acetic acid, leading to a buildup of acetaldehyde levels in the blood.

What is Antabuse, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Disulfiram is an oral drug used for treating alcoholism. Alcohol is converted in the body into acetaldehyde by an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase. Another enzyme called acetaldehyde dehydrogenase then converts acetaldehyde into acetic acid. Disulfiram prevents acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from converting acetaldehyde into acetic acid, leading to a buildup of acetaldehyde levels in the blood.

The disulfiram-like activity

Animal charcoal contains about 10 per cent carbon. The remainder is a mixture of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate plus small amounts of nitrogen, iron, sulfur, magnesium and silicon. Animal charcoal contains about 16 per cent volatile materials and yields 80 per cent ash. Strong acids rapidly liberate hydrogen sulfide from animal charcoal.

Animal charcoal is not toxic when fed to dogs in single doses as large as 5 gm./kgm., or in daily doses of 2 gm./kgm. for as long as 154 days. It produced no symptoms when 9 gm. were taken daily by human subjects for 21 days.

Presentation

Patients experiencing these often frightening disulfiram-type reactions seldom need specific treatment; however, it is mandatory to strongly caution patients not to consume alcoholic beverages for a few days after treatment with these cephalosporins. 42 Subsequently, disulfiram was approved by the FDA for the the treatment for alcoholism in 1951. Certain drugs such as metronidazole, sulfonamides, nitrofurantoin, chloramphenicol have also been implicated in causation of disulfiram-like reaction. 2 Clinical effect of azithromycin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis. Read More Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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