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Clotrimzaole &Betamethasome Dipropionate

Clotrimzaole  &Betamethasome Dipropionate

Dosage Forms and Strengths

Cream, 1%/0.05% (base). Each gram of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, USP contains 10 mg of clotrimazole, USP and 0.64 mg of betamethasone dipropionate USP, (equivalent to 0.5 mg of betamethasone) in a white to off-white hydrophilic cream.

Betamethasone-Clotrimazole Topical Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Topical steroid medicine can be absorbed through the skin, which may affect your adrenal gland. Call your doctor if you have:

  • nausea, vomiting, severe dizziness;
  • muscle weakness;
  • depressed mood, feeling irritable;
  • weight loss; or
  • tired feeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • burning or tingling of treated skin;
  • rash; or
  • swelling.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur.

Before Using

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Use of Lotrisone® cream is not recommended in children younger than 17 years of age.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of clotrimazole and betamethasone topical combination in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have a thinning skin or skin ulcers, which may require caution in patients receiving clotrimazole and betamethasone topical combination.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

How should this medicine be used?

Clotrimazole comes as a cream, lotion, powder, and solution to apply to the skin; lozenges (called troches) to dissolve in the mouth; and vaginal tablets and vaginal cream to be inserted into the vagina. Clotrimazole is usually used five times a day for 14 days for oral thrush, twice a day (in the morning and evening) for 2 to 8 weeks for skin infections, and once a day at bedtime for 3 or 7 days for vaginal infections. Follow the directions on the package or your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use clotrimazole exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

To use the topical cream, lotion, or solution, thoroughly clean the infected area, allow it to dry, and then gently rub the medication in until most of it disappears. Use just enough medication to cover the affected area. You should wash your hands after applying the medication.

The lozenges should be placed in the mouth and dissolved slowly over about 15 to 30 minutes. Do not chew or swallow the lozenges whole.

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