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Can Azithromycin Treat Uti

Can Azithromycin Treat Uti

What Is A Urinary Tract Infection (Uti)?

The urinary tract is comprised of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra (see Figure 1). A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection caused by pathogenic organisms (for example, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in any of the structures that comprise the urinary tract. However, this is the broad definition of urinary tract infections; many authors prefer to use more specific terms that localize the urinary tract infection to the major structural segment involved such as urethritis (urethral infection), cystitis (bladder infection), ureter infection, and pyelonephritis (kidney infection). Other structures that eventually connect to or share close anatomic proximity to the urinary tract (for example, prostate, epididymis, and vagina) are sometimes included in the discussion of UTIs because they may either cause or be caused by UTIs. Technically, they are not UTIs and will be briefly mentioned in this article.

What Are The Different Types Of Urinary Tract Infection And Bladder Infection Medicines

The urinary tract includes the bladder, ureters, urethra, and kidneys. When bacteria travels up the urethra, it can travel into the bladder or kidneys, causing infection. Bladder infection is called cystitis. In most cases, antibiotics are used. Commonly prescribed antibiotics to treat bacterial urinary tract infections and bladder infections include Levaquin (levofloxacin), Cipro, Proquin (ciprofloxacin), Keflex (cephalexin), Zotrim, Bactrim (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole), Macrobid, Furadantin (nitrofurantoin), Monurol (fosfomycin), Hiprex (methenamine hippurate), Trimpex, Proloprim, Primsol (trimethoprim), and NegGram (nalidixic acid). Cystitis may also be treated with pain relievers such as Pyridium (phenazopyridine).

Diagnosis

Tests and procedures used to diagnose urinary tract infections include:

Analyzing a urine sample. Your doctor may ask for a urine sample for lab analysis to look for white blood cells, red blood cells or bacteria. To avoid potential contamination of the sample, you may be instructed to first wipe your genital area with an antiseptic pad and to collect the urine midstream.

Growing urinary tract bacteria in a lab. Lab analysis of the urine is sometimes followed by a urine culture. This test tells your doctor what bacteria are causing your infection and which medications will be most effective.

Creating images of your urinary tract. If you are having frequent infections that your doctor thinks may be caused by an abnormality in your urinary tract, you may have an ultrasound, a computerized tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Your doctor may also use a contrast dye to highlight structures in your urinary tract.

Using a scope to see inside your bladder. If you have recurrent UTIs, your doctor may perform a cystoscopy, using a long, thin tube with a lens (cystoscope) to see inside your urethra and bladder. The cystoscope is inserted in your urethra and passed through to your bladder

Which antibiotic should be used to treat a UTI?

There are multiple types of antibiotics used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Most UTIs (75-95%) in women are caused by a bacteria known as Escherichia coli (E. coli). Other Enterobacteriaceae types of bacteria may infrequently be present. Different treatments may be recommended in different areas of the country based on regional patterns of drug resistance, so it’s important to consider these effects, even with E. Coli.

Most patients with an uncomplicated UTI will begin treatment without any special diagnostic test, although a urinalysis may be performed by taking a urine sample. In a urinalysis, chemical components of the urine are determined, and the doctor may look at urine color, clarity, and a view a sample under the microscope. A urine culture may be order, too, but is not always needed to start treatment. A urine culture can define the specific bacteria causing the UTI, in more complicated cases, or in the case of treatment failure.

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