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Azithromycin For Uti

azithromycin for uti

Have you experienced a urinary tract infection?

If you have ever experienced the frequent urge to go the bathroom with painful burning urination, you have probably experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI). You may be surprised to know that UTIs are the second most common type of infection in the body, accounting for over 8 million visits to health care providers each year. Sometimes a UTI can be self-limiting, meaning that your body can fight the infection without antibiotics; however, most uncomplicated UTI cases can be treated quickly with a short course of oral UTI antibiotics.

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

A UTI infection can happen anywhere along your urinary tract, which includes the kidneys (the organ that filters the blood to make urine), the ureters (the tubes that take urine from each kidney to the bladder), the bladder (stores urine), or the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside).

A lower urinary tract infection occurs when bacteria gets into the urethra and is deposited up into the bladder -- this is called cystitis. Infections that get past the bladder and up into the kidneys are called pyelonephritis . An infection of the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside is called urethritis. UTI symptoms in women and men are similar.

Which antibiotic should be used to treat a UTI?

There are multiple types of antibiotics used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Most UTIs (75-95%) in women are caused by a bacteria known as Escherichia coli (E. coli). Other Enterobacteriaceae types of bacteria may infrequently be present. Different treatments may be recommended in different areas of the country based on regional patterns of drug resistance, so it’s important to consider these effects, even with E. Coli.

Most patients with an uncomplicated UTI will begin treatment without any special diagnostic test, although a urinalysis may be performed by taking a urine sample. In a urinalysis, chemical components of the urine are determined, and the doctor may look at urine color, clarity, and a view a sample under the microscope. A urine culture may be order, too, but is not always needed to start treatment. A urine culture can define the specific bacteria causing the UTI, in more complicated cases, or in the case of treatment failure.

Symptoms like burning while urinating will usually clear up in within one to two days after starting treatment. Be sure to finish your entire course of medication. If symptoms are still present after 2 to 3 days, contact your healthcare provider.

How should this medicine be used?

Azithromycin comes as a tablet, an extended-release (long-acting) suspension (liquid), and a suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. The tablets and suspension (Zithromax) are usually taken with or without food once a day for 1–5 days. When used for the prevention of disseminated MAC infection, azithromycin tablets are usually taken with or without food once weekly. The extended-release suspension (Zmax) is usually taken on an empty stomach (at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal) as a one-time dose. To help you remember to take azithromycin, take it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take azithromycin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Shake the liquid well before each use to mix the medication evenly. Use a dosing spoon, oral syringe, or measuring cup to measure the correct amount of medication. Rinse the measuring device with water after taking the full dose of medication.

If you receive azithromycin powder for suspension (Zithromax) in the single-dose, 1-gram packet, you must first mix it with water before you take the medication. Mix the contents of the 1-gram packet with 1/4 cup (60 mL) of water in a glass and consume the entire contents immediately. Add an additional 1/4 cup (60 mL) of water to the same glass, mix, and consume the entire contents to ensure that you receive the entire dose.

Azithromycin Side Effects

Common Side Effects of Azithromycin

Many people experience fewer side effects when taking azithromycin compared with other antibiotics in the macrolide class, such as erythromycin (Erythrocin).

However, you may still experience side effects, especially if your doctor prescribed a high dose of azithromycin to be taken just one time. Tell your doctor if you experience any of the following:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Gas
  • Loose stools
  • Stomach discomfort

Some people may also experience cramps and yeast or vaginal infection.

Serious Side Effects

Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following:

  • Chest pain
  • Seizures
  • Swelling of the feet or ankles
  • Inflammation of the colon (symptoms may include abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue)
  • Fluid build-up between the lungs and the chest wall (symptoms may include chest pain or heaviness, or difficulty breathing difficulties)
  • Low count of white blood cells (this is usually discovered in blood tests, but if you have symptoms, they may include weakness, tiredness, shortness of breath, or infections that do not go away)

Know More About This Medicine and Buy Now :  MedyPharma.com

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